Dry Flies & Business

[singlepic id=2259 w=320 h=240 float=right]

I woke yesterday with options. I saw Liz out the door and off to work. I had the choice to fish but the strong winds and already pretty cold air temp of ~4degrees by 8am made up my mind for me. I have my limits you know. So what to do with the morning off but brew coffee and tie flies. The question…what to tie? I’ve been watching this video again and again and it’s getting to me. The only problem here is the standard dry fly, I suck at tying these damn things and I’ve got a mental thing going on that has allowed me to avoid them. I spent the first hour of daylight sipping coffee and sucking it up. I whipped out 1/2 dozen in a reasonable time of ~40minutes and was actually a bit surprised. I [singlepic id=2260 w=360 h=280 float=left]think they will do the job and they don’t look all bad. The hardest aspect of this fly for me is getting the wings positioned properly. I have to admit I kind of enjoyed tying them and will be at it again soon, as I ‘ve been told practice makes perfect…

With the remaining portion of my morning I took care of business. I cleaned the kitchen. The stove, microwave, counter tops, vacuumed and even did a bit of laundry. My home is primarily heated with a wood pellet stove of which it consumes a few hundred lbs of hardwood pellets every week, especially when it’s cold enough to keep me home tying flies rather than fishing. I finished the morning by hauling 400lbs from the barn to the porch. Gotta keep the lady of the manor pleased with me, she after all allows me to fish like a non-stop fool, attends TU meetings, fixes my clothes and puts up with trout talk all the time. She deserves it for sure. Next thing she is getting is a pair of breathable waders though. Not a bad morning save the lack of trout smell on my hands.

[singlepic id=2256 w=495 h=415 float=center]

[nggallery id=175]

12 Comments:

  1. A man has to do what a man has to do. Sounds kind of like my day.

    Mark

  2. You are a good man. I would be proud of those dries. You’re right about those wings too; they can be tricky. Thanks for sharing.

    Ben

  3. I’d mix in some dun to dark dun colored wings for the DH dries also. An easy pattern to try would be a snowshoe dun (in dun color).

  4. Hennies?! heres to a spring that doesn’t blow em out. Hopefully the high water comes early to mid-march and the macro drift stacks em in our favorite spots.

    I too suggest a darker wing as that creek’s hennie hatch typically has more dark winged mayflies than light winged. To compliment my match the hatch flies I like to tie on an Adams and a red humpy for the three fly rig.

  5. So now for my ignorant question. When you say “darker” wing are you referring to the woodduck or the hackle? I’m assuming woodduck…

  6. Heath’s right – darker wings (hackle). Red quills are great (split wing with dun hackle), and so is a basic Adams. For flat water, I use a CDC dun. It doesn’t float well once it gets slimed up, but it fishes well.

    I’m not overly optimistic that the hennies will be as prolific as last year considering the snowpack and the potential for some serious flooding.

  7. Thanks for the advice guys I appreciate it. I’ll take that info into consideration. I’ll have to invest in some darker dun hackle. I don’t have much if any, mostly lt. dun. I’ll be watching the rocks and the flooding, hopefully it won’t be as bad as it could be.

  8. Is that a norwex cleaning towel. Try the usual with dark wings for the DH.

  9. http://www.sershenbros.com/wp-content/photos/2006/April2006/2006-04-08_CrookedCreek/2006-04-08_CrookedCreek_12.jpg

    Although the wing of the DH is not any standard wing colour I find success in a blue dun coloured hackle. I would like to remind you that the coloured duck flank is more for the fly angler than the insect imitation in that it helps a skilled angler separate their fly from an armada of naturals. With that, I would suggest that a black hackle with a yellow mallard flank flag softens the colours from a dominate eyed trouts perspective.

    As a side note I would state that the best hennie emergence that I have experienced was in 2005 where the water was high and stained throughout their emergence period as the weather was ideal and abnormally steady after a quick snow melt and high creeks. My notes say that the hatch began late March and ran through mid April where BWO, DH, and caddis were all hatching predictably and a smattering of midge were consistently emerging throughout the day.

    Barometer – 29.85 steady, clear, 70 degree F air temp, 60-62 degree water temp, harvester opening

    Midge present upon arrival
    10AM BWO
    12PM Charcoal Caddis
    2.15PM DH
    2.30PM Grey Caddis
    3.40PM BWO
    Midge steady throughout the day

    that was a wonderful year as temperatures were steady in the mid to upper 60′s, caddis were hatching in the WW area late march.

  10. Every once in a while I get the feeling that I ought to get better at tying those Catskill style dries. I started tying in the age of the comparadun and parachute. The comparadun was especially attractive to me and my very limited financial resources back in the day. So – I never spent the time with the traditionally hackled dry that maybe I should have. Frankly the cost of a good rooster neck is enough to keep me away even today. Still…well they look pretty good to me – I hope you got that out of your system!

  11. Thanks Anthony, I’m a perfectionist and maybe that’s not the best attribute to have as a tyer. I’ll be working on comparaduns soon, thanks for the thought.

  12. Anything worth doing is worth doing well. There is really not much quite as comforting as a well put together fly – the perfect proportions, the tidy head, the tail splayed just so, the tips of the wings just above the hackle…it brings a little order to a chaotic world.

    Some say it doesn’t matter to the fish…maybe so, but it matters to me. And it sounds like it matters to you too.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *