Alliaria petiolata

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Otherwise known as Garlic Mustard, a plant brought by European settlers, cultivated for use as food and medicine which now poses a great risk to our native plants and animals. I have been working on the side as a mild-mannered citizen of Winona with no connection to a Fly Factory and as such I am involving myself in a few “side” projects. One such project could find me and others dealing with the harsh realities of this plant and the havoc it can exhibit on the natural eco-system. As angler’s we have a responsibility to know and protect the watersheds that provide us with the necessary components for the activities we love. Find out what invasive species are in your area, know how to identify them and do so on a regular basis so that you may avoid spreading them. Also, once you can confidently identify invasive speciesĀ please contact appropriate agencies and let them know where you were and what you came across.

4 Comments:

  1. Common Buckthorn Rhamnus carthartica is in most areas including whitewater along with another I am seeing as a problem is Amur maple seeding in understory areas choking out the native plant materials.

  2. I got written permission from our local forester to cut as much buckthorn as I want from our 22 acre woods here right by the house. We use it for all kinds of things – trellises, carving, garden stakes, posts, and teepee poles to name a few. Remove the invasive and put it to use. It’s satisfying work too. I’ve heard a lot about garlic mustard but haven’t worked on it at all in any location.

    What about salmo trutta, another invasive? Ask DNR what they think about brown vs brook.

    For that matter, what about Norwegians? Exotic species.

  3. This is very interesting. If you are considering the natural world as only being natives then you may want to consider this.

    http://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=brown+trout+invasive&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8

    This type of positioning has always amazed me. it is true that we pick and choose our battles.

    I find it interesting that the MN DNR does not consider Brown Trout invasives however it does Common Carp. With this it seems that someone needs a lesson in ecology.

  4. hopefully the native americans dont get written permission to remove invasive species.

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